The Black Art Depot

US Marshall Bass Reeves

Harold Holden
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Description

A sculpture by celebrated Western Artist Harold Holden that pays tribute to the life and legacy of the feared African American US Marshall, Bass Reeves. The sculpture is bronzetone and made to look identical to the monument in Fort Smith, Arkansas by Harold Holden entitled "Into the Territory".

It depicts Reeves preparing to ride out into the Indian Territory to capture another outlaw with his rifle in hand and his dog by his side. A limited edition work of art available in two sizes.

The large size is: 14.5 inches (Height) x 16 inches (Length) x 6 inches (Width) with an edition size of 25.

The Smaller size is: 9 inches (Height) x 9 inches (Length) x 5.5 inches (Width) with an edition size of 25.

$2,750.00

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Description

A sculpture by celebrated Western Artist Harold Holden that pays tribute to the life and legacy of the feared African American US Marshall, Bass Reeves. The sculpture is bronzetone and made to look identical to the monument in Fort Smith, Arkansas by Harold Holden entitled "Into the Territory".

It depicts Reeves preparing to ride out into the Indian Territory to capture another outlaw with his rifle in hand and his dog by his side. A limited edition work of art available in two sizes.

The large size is: 14.5 inches (Height) x 16 inches (Length) x 6 inches (Width) with an edition size of 25.

The Smaller size is: 9 inches (Height) x 9 inches (Length) x 5.5 inches (Width) with an edition size of 25.

Specs.
Edition Limited Edition
Edition Size See Product Description
Height See Product Description
Length See Product Description
Medium Stone
Signed Unsigned
SKU haho100
Harold Holden
HAROLD T. HOLDEN, or "H" as he is called by many, was born in Enid, Oklahoma. Although "H" was the first professional fine artist in the family, he comes from a family of creative and talented inventors and engineers. In 1915, his great- grandfather George Failing invented the machine that creates the bottle cap that is still used on beverages today. His grandfather, oil pioneer George E. Failing, invented the first portable drilling rig, as well as numerous drilling bits, still used in the industry. "H" credits his love of horses to his father who was an avid horseman. After graduating from Enid High School, "H" attended Oklahoma State University and graduated from the Texas Academy of Art in Houston. He then began his art career in the commercial art field, working in Wichita, Kansas and in Houston, Texas, where he eventually took the position of art director at Horseman Magazine. While working during the day for other folks, "H" began his fine art career at night, painting and sculpting his first love, the West.
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