The Black Art Depot

Steepin' and Soakin'

Annie Lee
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Description

A shower curtain featuring the timeless artwork of Annie Lee. This image depicts an African American woman in a bathtub after a very long day. She is steepin' and soakin' her body and bones in an attempt to recover.  Some hot tea at her side and book in her hand...trying to find some me time and relaxation in the day to day struggle.

The shower curtain measures 70x70 inches and is mold, mildew, water repellent and soap resistant. The grommets on the shower curtain are rustproof. The shower curtain also ships with 12 plastic hooks included. Weighs 2 pounds.

Affordable, functional artwork with inspirational messages to add life to your bathroom decor. Let us help you Turn Your House into a Home!

$29.99

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Description

A shower curtain featuring the timeless artwork of Annie Lee. This image depicts an African American woman in a bathtub after a very long day. She is steepin' and soakin' her body and bones in an attempt to recover.  Some hot tea at her side and book in her hand...trying to find some me time and relaxation in the day to day struggle.

The shower curtain measures 70x70 inches and is mold, mildew, water repellent and soap resistant. The grommets on the shower curtain are rustproof. The shower curtain also ships with 12 plastic hooks included. Weighs 2 pounds.

Affordable, functional artwork with inspirational messages to add life to your bathroom decor. Let us help you Turn Your House into a Home!

Specs.
Edition Open Edition
Height 70 inches
Length 70 inches
Medium Polyester
Signed Unsigned
SKU DSC158
Year Released 2020
Annie Lee
Ever since taking the art world by storm during her first gallery show in 1985 at the age of 50, where her artwork sold out in just four hours, Annie Lee has been a central and celebrated figure in the world of art. Her style was labeled by art commentators as "Black Americana" due to her use of scenes of everyday African American life, the animated emotion of the personalities and two-dimensional figures. Another recognizable and trademark aspect of her is art is the fact that her subjects were often faceless.
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