The Black Art Depot

Bass Guitar Man

Francis Agbete
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Description

An authentic hand made Africans sculpture masterfully crafted out of dark brown teak wood by Francis Agbete. It depicts a musician playing the strings of the bass guitar and making magic happen as he conjures a heavenly sound. 

This sculpture is crafted out of teak wood. Ghanaian teakwood is noted for its reliability and water resistance. The sculpture measures 8.75 inches (Height) x 4.5 inches (Width) x 1.8 inches (Depth) and weighs approximately 10 ounces. Makes a great gift for any bass player.

Each sculpture is crafted by hand so there may be slight and subtle variations in color, size and pattern.

$115.99

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Description

An authentic hand made Africans sculpture masterfully crafted out of dark brown teak wood by Francis Agbete. It depicts a musician playing the strings of the bass guitar and making magic happen as he conjures a heavenly sound. 

This sculpture is crafted out of teak wood. Ghanaian teakwood is noted for its reliability and water resistance. The sculpture measures 8.75 inches (Height) x 4.5 inches (Width) x 1.8 inches (Depth) and weighs approximately 10 ounces. Makes a great gift for any bass player.

Each sculpture is crafted by hand so there may be slight and subtle variations in color, size and pattern.

Specs.
Edition Each Sculpture is Hand Made by a Master Ghanaian Artisan
Height See Product Description
Length 4.5 inches
Medium Teakwood
Signed Unsigned
SKU 239078
Width 1.8 inches
Francis Agbete
My name is Francis Agbete and I come from a family of traditional wood carvers. I was born December 28, 1976 in a suburb of Accra. I attended the Vakpo Secondary Technical Institute from 1994 to 1996, and upon graduation I enrolled at the Accra Poly-Technical Institute to read Mechanical Technician course grade two. While at school, funding was becoming a difficulty. So during weekends and vacations, I would visit my father's wood carving workshop and assist him by carving some products for sale. I have always helped my father when he's needed me, so coming to assist my father at the workshop at this time of my educational career was not a new job for me.

The realization eventually dawned on me to stay on, work on my own designs, and display my own woodcarvings so that I could earn enough to support my education. I ventured and opened a workshop at the Craft Village near the Tetteh Quarshie Circle. Managing and controlling the operations of the shop was becoming a problem since, as a student, I needed more time for my studies than for my carving jobs. To solve this problem, I explained this idea both to my sister, Mary Agbete and my cousin, Stephen Agbete and asked them about the possibility of looking after the workshop and selling the items I carved while I was at school.
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